The Hardest Times Require the Strongest Support

2019-02-14T14:38:19+00:00February 14th, 2019|Hot Topics, Stories of Hope|

By Erik Hale When I was just 30 years old I was diagnosed with stage 3A adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer. After diagnosis I spent six weeks going through radiation and chemotherapy treatment to reduce the tumor size before going in for a lobectomy procedure where half of my left lung and 20 lymph nodes were removed. The recovery process was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to endure and I remember those long days in the hospital with my wife Aloy [...]

Traveling with Cancer

2019-01-31T18:12:43+00:00January 31st, 2019|Hot Topics, Stories of Hope|

By Elizabeth De Jong, lung cancer survivor My parents had an (at the time) unconventional commuting marriage for most of my childhood. Weekends were spent in cars visiting the parent that wasn’t living with us at the moment. These trips sparked a wanderlust in me at a young age. My husband and I collect experiences the way that others collect antiques or action figures. So, when I was diagnosed with lung cancer in September of 2016, our goal was to [...]

2019 Forecast for Lung Cancer Research and Treatments

2019-01-24T16:10:01+00:00January 24th, 2019|Hot Topics|

Last year was an exciting year for lung cancer research with more U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval decisions relevant to lung cancer than ever before.  So, what can we expect for 2019?  Another eventful year with researchers studying how to best give the approved drugs (i.e. what order and combinations) as well as expanding the options with more types of therapies. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER First, there is the rapidly growing field of immunotherapy.  We have [...]

New Combination Treatment Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

2018-12-07T14:39:55+00:00December 7th, 2018|Hot Topics, News|

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved atezolizumab (TECENTRIQ®), an immunotherapy drug, in combination with bevacizumab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSq NSCLC) with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations. This is the first four drug combination treatment approved for lung cancer. Click here to learn more.

FDA Approves New Combination Treatment for NSCLC

2018-11-01T20:42:17+00:00October 31st, 2018|Hot Topics, News|

Tuesday, October 30, 2018 – Today the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved immunotherapy drug, pembrolizumab, also known as KEYTRUDA, in combination with chemotherapies, carboplatin, and either paclitaxel or nab-paclitaxel as a first-line treatment for patients with metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of the randomized trial showed an increase in overall survival, progression-free survival and overall response rate. Click here to read the full press release.

FDA expands approval of Gilotrif (afatinib) for NSCLC

2018-03-21T20:16:59+00:00January 17th, 2018|Hot Topics, News|

Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – The FDA expanded approval of Gilotrif (afatinib), a first-line treatment for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) that is epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive. Patients with lung cancers with EGFR S768I, L861Q and G719X may now take Gilotrif. Gilotrif, an oral, once-daily EGFR-directed therapy developed by Boehringer Ingelheim, is currently approved in the U.S. to treat people with NSCLC that has certain EGFR gene changes, has spread to other parts of the body [...]

FDA Approves First-Line Treatment for NSCLC with ALK Biomarker

2018-03-23T14:58:25+00:00November 7th, 2017|Hot Topics, News|

Monday, November 6, 2017 - The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Alecensa (alectinib) as a first treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer that is positive for a biomarker called ALK.  Alecensa was already approved for ALK+ lung cancer that was resistant to other ALK-targeted therapies. Now, a large randomized clinical trial showed that Alecensa was more effective than previous first-line treatment.  Patients had an average of 25.7 months without their cancer progressing (getting worse) when taking [...]